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2. Theories of Language Description - F16

2. Theories of Language Description - F16

 

Aims:

The course aims to introduce students to the basic theories of language to enhance their understanding of Linguistics. By the end of this course students will be able to develop a thorough understanding of the philosophical and theoretical frameworks, the knowledge of which is essential for linguistic analysis.

 

Contents:

·       Language and Philosophy

·       Issues in the Philosophy of Language

·       Some major philosophers and their philosophy of language (Bakhtin, Locke, Wittgenstein, etc)

·       Theories of Language

·       Theories of Meaning

·       Major Schools of Linguistics:

o   Historicism

o   Structuralism

o   Descriptivism

o   Functionalism

o   Generativism

 Weekly Schedule

Week

Topic

Philosophical / Theoretical Readings

Practical / Logic Reading

A Concise Introduction to Logic, Patrick J. Hurley

1

Introduction to the Course

 

1.1 Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions

1.2 Recognizing Arguments

2

Theories of Meaning

W1-TLD-Theories of Meaning - Akmajian (Download from Website)

1.3 Deduction and Induction

1.4 Validity, Truth, Soundness, Strength, Cogency

3

Words and things

Classical philosophy

The British Empiricists

Names

Use and mention

Mill on direct reference

Frege on sense and reference

Russell on descriptions

Kripke on naming

Words and things in linguistics

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 1

(Download book from course website)

1.5 Argument Forms: Proving Invalidity

1.6 Extended Arguments

4

Propositions and logic

Propositions

Formal logic

Propositional logic

Predicate logic

Entailment and presupposition

Frege on logical presupposition

Russell on denoting

Strawson on referring

Pragmatic presupposition

Logic and linguistics

 

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 2

2.1 Varieties of Meaning

2.2 The Intension and Extension of Terms

5

Truth and reality

Truth conditions

Analytic and synthetic sentences

Verification

Truth theories

Possible worlds

Modality

Counterfactuals

Montague Grammar

Linguistic semantics

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 3

2.3 Definitions and Their Purposes

2.4 Definitional Techniques

6

Speakers and hearers

Introduction

Wittgenstein’s philosophy of language

Ordinary language philosophy

Speech acts

Performatives

Illocutionary force

Searle on speech acts

Meaning and intention

Conversational implicature

Natural language and logic

The co-operative principle

Flouting the maxims

Pragmatics

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 4

2.5 Criteria for Lexical Defi nitions

7

Language and mind

Signs and structures

Linguistic determinism

Empiricism

Bloomfield

Quine

The Innateness Hypothesis

Anti-nativism

The language faculty

Knowledge and use of language

Empiricist and mentalist linguistics

 

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 5

6.1 Symbols and Translation

6.2 Truth Functions

8

Language and Mind (Cont)

Book03-Philosophy For Linguists: An Introduction-Siobhan Chapman.pdf

Chapter 1

6.3 Truth Tables for Propositions

6.4 Truth Tables for Arguments

9

Mid Term Exam

10

Major Philosophers in the Philosophy of Language – Part 1

Reading to be confirmed

6.5 Indirect Truth Tables

11

Major Philosophers in the Philosophy of Language – Part 2

Reading to be confirmed

6.6 Argument Forms and Fallacies

12

Major Schools of Linguistics – Part 1: Historicism

Reading to be confirmed

8.1 Symbols and Translation

8.2 Using the Rules of Inference

13

Major Schools of Linguistics – Part 2: Structuralism
Descriptivism

 

Reading to be confirmed

8.3 Change of Quantifier Rule

8.4 Conditional and Indirect Proof

14

Major Schools of Linguistics – Part 2:  Functionalism
Generativism

Reading to be confirmed

8.5 Proving Invalidity

8.6 Relational Predicates and Overlapping Quantifiers

15

Presentations and Exam Revision

 

8.7 Identity

16

End Term Exam

 

Essential Readings:

Book03. Chapman, S. (2000). Philosophy for Linguistics: an introduction. Routledge.

Bookm04. Hurley, Patrick. A Concise Introduction to Logic. 

 

Bookm01. Martinich,Aloysius P., ed. The Philosophy of Language. 4th ed. New York, NY:Oxford University Press, 2001. *** (Download)

Bookm02. Kripke, Saul. Naming and Necessity. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980.

Bookm03. Lycan, William G. Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction, Routledge, 2008.

Book14. Morris, M. (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press. ***

 

Recommended Readings:

1. Becker, J. C. (2005). A Modern Theory of Language Evolution. iUniverse.  (yet to be sourced)

2. Buhler, K. (1990). Theory of Language: the representational function of language.  (PDF Available - Ask your tutor)

3. Chapman, S. (2000). Philosophy for Linguistics: an introduction. Routledge.

4. Chapman, S., & Routledge, C. (2005). Key Thinkers in Linguistics and the Philosophy of Language. Routledge(yet to be sourced) 

5. Devitt, M., & Hanley, R. (2006). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Publishing.

6. Devitt, M., & Sterenly, K. (1999). Language and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of language. (Second edition). Blackwell Publishing. (PDF Available - Ask your tutor)

7. Frajzyngier, Z., Hodges, A., & Rood, S. D. (Eds.), (2005). Linguistic Diversity and Language Theories. John Benjamins Publishing Company.

8. Hale, B., & Wright, C. (Eds.), (2003). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Publishing.

9. Hornby, J., & Longworth, G. (2006). Reading Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Publishing.

10. Losonsky, M. (2006). Linguistic Turns in Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.  (yet to be sourced)

11. Mahmoudian, M. (1993). Modern theories of language: the empirical challenge. Duke University Press.  (yet to be sourced)

12. Metthews, H. P. (1993).Grammatical theory in the United States from Bloomfield to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press.

13. Metthews, P. (2001). A Short History of Structural Linguistics. Cambridge University Press.

14. Morris, M. (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press. ***

15. Subrahmanyam, K. (2008). Theories of Language: oriental and occidental. D.K Printworld. (yet to be sourced)

16. Weisler, E.S., & Milekic, S. (2000) . Theory of Language. MIT Press

17.Hurley, Patrick. A Concise Introduction to Logic. 

 

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Abid Qazi,
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Abid Qazi,
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